• Territory Anglers' Fly Fishing Destinations
  • Territory Anglers' Fly Fishing Destinations
  • Territory Anglers' Fly Fishing Destinations
  • Territory Anglers' Fly Fishing Destinations
  • Territory Anglers' Fly Fishing Destinations
  • Territory Anglers' Fly Fishing Destinations

Territory Anglers' Fly Fishing Destinations


The Yellowstone River

What can you say about the Yellowstone that hasn't already been said? It winds it's way through the park before exiting at Gardiner, on it's way to the Missouri River, some 640 plus miles downstream. For most of us, it's the 70 or so miles between Gardiner and Big Timber, that's the best. Granted there is some great water to fish inside the park, but below Gardiner one can cover much more fish habitat from a drift boat and therefore increase their chances of hooking up one of the fabled Yellowstone cutthroats, browns, or rainbows. The Yellowstone tumbles down from the Yellowstone plateau to Gardiner and then bounces it's way down through Yankee Jim Canyon to Paradise Valley, where it slows down and becomes the classic western fly fishing destination, cherished by all that know it.


The Madison River

The Madison River, like the Yellowstone, is one of the classic fly fishing rivers of the western U.S. Thatís where the similarities end. The Madison, between Quake Lake and Ennis, is called the 50 mile riffle, not a single eddy, pool, or structure to slow down the river. Instead itís a constant river wide riffle, traveling 5 mph and producing some of the most consistent big fish in SW Montana. Because there isnít much variety of fish habitat, there isnít a lot of head scratching about how to fish this water and that helps take the mystery out of what techniques to employ. Basically the Madison is a nymphing river, but when dry flies are working, it can be on fire. Come see what all the fuss is about.


Idaho's Middle Fork of the Salmon River

The Middle Fork of the Salmon River tumbles through the Frank Church Wilderness Area in central Idaho, the lower forty-eight states largest wilderness area, for a hundred miles towards it's confluence with the main Salmon River. The Middle Fork traverses some of the most breathtaking, beautiful and wild river landscapes of the American west. Perfect camp, after perfect camp on the benches above the river, soaking in hot springs, hiking up side canyons and casting into slicks stacked with cutthroat and rainbow trout, almost naÔve of your fly.

The Middle Fork is an ideal vacation for anglers floating with non-angling family members, with a variety of river craft to float on, guests can choose from the mild to wild ride on the river. Join Territory Anglers guides for this legendary trip with our friends and hosts, ECHO River Trips, the wilderness company.

TA Guide Notes: Before I'd floated the Middle Fork, I'd heard all the chatter about the Middle Fork of the Salmon River. It being perhaps second, only to the Grand Canyon, as far as, being a truly a world-class wilderness white-water trip. Twenty years later, I am still entranced by this river, for me it is my favorite river to float. The Middle Fork embodies all that I can imagine making a great river trip, excellent whitewater, stunning campsites, miles of riverside trails, hot springs to soak in and some damn good trout fishing in a remote, grand swathe of the northern Rockies. Join us on the Middle Fork, I know a couple of good fishing holes and a good hike or two...TB


Mongolia

Its very name is synonymous with the remote and exotic. A landscape reminiscent of Montana without roads or fences, Mongolia is vast and beautiful. The prize for most fishermen visiting Mongolia is the opportunity to catch Taimen trout, the world's largest salmonid. Floating the rivers of the Onon region, it's tempting to compare Mongolia's waters to Montana's blue-ribbon streams... Without the parking space and fishing hole competition. Taimen aggressively take wet and dry flies. Large mouse patterns and streamers are our favorites. Once hooked, taimen usually make reel-burning runs and explode out of the river. Each evening after a day of floating, fishermen return to our camp comprised of the Mongolian Ger (yurts). Gers are the traditional nomad tent of the native Mongolians. Spacious, dome shaped structures with a wooden frame covered by insulating layers of felt and canvas. Gers are roomy and charming spaces, complete with table and chairs, twin beds and a wood stove. Visit www.MongoliaRivers.com.